Bunker Hill 17th June 1775 & the assault on Dorchester Heights - Part 1

We had a fantastic weekend of wargaming in the West Country refighting The Battle of Bunker Hill and the assault on Dorchester Heights. We started the weekend with the a re-fight of Bunker Hill. An amazing set up for this game covering Boston harbour, Charleston and Charleston Neck complete with ships and assault boats. We used some beautifully painted 28mm figures and for rules we used an adapted version of British Grenadier to cope with some very big units many of which were 48- 80 figures in strength!

I was on the side of the Grand American Army for the weekend. The Americans were divided into roughly 3 commands. I was in charge of the troops commanded by Colonel Stark. My job was to protect the left flank of the US troops occupying the fortifications on Breed's Hill. The other commands in addition to Stark were Prescott who occupied Breed's hill and Charleston. The third command was a reserve off table under Brigadier Putnam which was very difficult to move and deploy (each unit requiring an successful initiative roll to move them) thanks to the American C&C remaining in Cambridge! Some unfortunate dice rolling during the early part of Saturday saw the demise of Colonel Stark and one of his New Hampshire Regiments fleeing after only a few casualties!

The British wisely deployed to outflank the fortifications on Breed Hill than attempting an historical direct assault. They moved to assault them from their right flank by land and by sea on the left flank. Stark despite his earlier demise and poor performance just about held off the British right flank (US left flank) but was under considerable pressure and only by adopting a skirmishing formation managed to inflict a number of casualties on the attacking forces. The left flank sea landings however broke through our reserves and took Breed Hill in the final few moves of the game. Casualties were pretty even. The American troops had failed to inflict significant casualties on the British as they did on the day in 1775.